Nalebinding – Viking Knitting Technique

A previous version of this tutorial was published on Think Crafts!

Want to knit like a Viking? Recently I had the pleasure of researching nalebinding for a school project. Nalebinding, also called Nalbinding or Viking knitting, is a fiber technique that predates both knitting and crochet. Egyptian socks from the 4th century were made using nalebinding. The Vikings also used nalebinding to create textiles and now you can too.

Materials

Wool Yarn
Yarn Needle
Velcro Sticky Back Coin Fasteners
Felt
Thread
Needle Felting Tool (optional)

Note
There are many types of nalebinding stitches but as this was my first time trying I went with a simple stitch. This method is called the Oslo stitch.

Pattern
Cut a length of yarn roughly a yard long. Anything longer becomes too wieldy to handle. Take the yarn and make a loop.

Place your needle through the loop.

Wrap the yarn over the needle.

Pull through. This creates a loop on your thumb.

This next step is tricky at first but once you get the hang of it it’s easy. Put your needle under the back loop. Twist the needle to then slide under the loop on your thumb and under the working yarn.

Pull through. You now have two loops on your thumb.

Slide the top loop behind your thumb.

This now becomes the loop you slide your needle under first.

After sliding the needle under the back loop twist it again to slide under the loop on your thumb and working needle. You’ll then have two loops on your thumb.

Repeat this step over and over under you have a length of chain. You can use multi ply yarn if you like. But it needs to be wool.

Why wool? Because when you get to the end of the yarn you’ll need to attach more.

Pull apart the yarn ends. You can spit splice them together but I preferred to use my needle felt tool.

Once you’ve joined the ends you can continue.

I decided to make a cell phone bag so I joined my ends once I reached my desired length. Slide the yarn needle under the first loop on the starter end before sliding under the loop behind your thumb.

For the next stitch slide your needle under the stitch to the right of the first starter stitch you worked in the last step. You’ll keep working to the right. Keep spiraling around until you’ve reached your desired length.

I wanted to make a little flap at the top so I stopped spiraling around. Instead I turned direction to pick up a stitch.

I worked back and forth until I had a little triangle.

Attach Sticky Velcro to give the flap quick access.

A small length of red felt makes for a cute tongue. Sew down with matching thread.

Find circular items to trace out shapes for the eyes on the felt. I used the thread spool for the white and a bottle cap for the black.

Sew on the eye.

Create a new chain of nalebinding stitches of desired length for the strap.

Sew strap onto bag.

Now you have a cute Viking monster!

I’m loving my new cell phone cozy. If you make your own please post a
pic in the comments.

Craft on!

Wicked Witch Gloves

My winter fingerless glove are officially done. I started these back when Josh and I were housesitting in Boston.

However, this particular yarn has been in my stash for years. I even brought it to Taiwan and back. Imagination is a Merino/alpaca mix and the colorway is called Wicked Witch. I remember laughing when I read the name and knowing I had to use this yarn for a special pattern.

Spatterdash is an advanced knitting pattern and just what I needed to refresh my knitting game. The yarn was a bit finicky to work with but is so gorgeous that the extra effort is worth it.

The fit and feel are great. When cooler weather returns I’ll be wearing these a lot.

This pattern calls for 28 buttons and it took awhile to sew them. But these metal little flowers are so lovely that the extra effort was worth it. I’m so happy with how pretty these turned out!

Name: Spatterdash
Pattern Source: Knitty
Craft: Knitting
Yarn: Knit Picks Imagination, Wicked Witch colorway
Needle Size: US 1/2.25 mm
Size: Medium

Fridge Magnets

This post was previously published on Think Crafts!

Need a special gift for a graduate this month? Fridge Magnets make a great present. Collect images from magazines and specialize a set for friends. Of all of my handmade gifts these magnets get the best reaction.

Materials

Glass Marbles

Magnets ½”

Eclectic Adhesive E6000

Miscellaneous magazine images

Cardstock

Pattern

Find small pictures for your magnets. Use a glass marble to lay over the magazine image to see if it fits. You can make a template by tracing around the marble on card stock.

I cut out a pretty flower blue pic, a Green Man and a sun and star for my magnets.

Squeeze a dot of glue onto the flat side of the marble. Place your image onto the glue. I find it’s best to do this in a well ventilated area as the glue smell is strong.

Check to see if it’s centered.

Set aside to dry with marble face down for 5-10 minutes. Place a dot of glue onto the magnet.

Place marble with image onto magnet. Adjust until it’s centered over magnet.

Set aside to dry.

Wrap them up and give away. Or make a set for yourself. This craft can easily be personalized which makes it a unique gift.

Craft on!

Cat Fur Hack

Recently I fixed my sewing machine with a clever hack. I inherited this machine and it’s pretty solid except that it was missing a small part. Usually there is a thin circle of felt that rests between the thread stopper and thread.

The missing felt meant that the thread moved around the thread holder rod and sometimes both it and the stopper slid off completely while I was sewing. With stores shut down because of Covid19 I couldn’t find a replacement locally. Ursula’s fur came to the rescue!

She’s a long haired girl and loves being brushed. Every time her hairbrush fills up I pull it off and store it in a zippie. I figured I’d experiment some while in quarantine! When I had a few hairbrush merkins I started needle felting.

Since the felt circle holds thread into place, I slid off a thread label and used that for my template.

Cat hair takes longer to felt since it’s not as long as sheep’s wool but otherwise it’s pretty similar. After needle felting for awhile I had a good thickness. I put the thread label on top and cut around the cat felt to match the shape.

I snipped a hole in the middle and needle felted more to round it out. It slid easily onto the thread holder rod.

To thank Ursula I took her on a walk. She loves sitting outside and eating grass.