Gluten Free Cooking

Josh and I have been doing a lot of home cooking this summer. The above is a delicious gluten free pie we made with strawberries, local rhubarb and local blackberries. It was delicious and blackberry season is one of my favorite times of year.

We planted arugula in our garden plot and got so much of it. My friend Helen turned me onto this green back in our NM days and it’s one of my faves. She also taught me how to make pesto and arugula gives this appetizer quite the zing.

We got into a pizza making kick and have been using garden greens as part of the toppings. So yummy!

I treated myself to a new gluten free baking cookbook and the results have been phenomenal. These dinner rolls were tasty and strong. How well did they hold their shape?

Strong enough to be a bread bowl! I haven’t had a bread bowl in years. This was such a delight I almost cried. The soup is split pea with pork belly, one of Josh’s signature dishes.

My new cookbook (review forthcoming!) also has a fantastic scone recipe.

These were cherry almond scones and they did not last long. Scones are one of those baked goods I missed most when I had to give up gluten. It’s such a delight to have them back in my life.

I like to eat a scone with a cup of coffee. It’s a perfect snack.

Bake on!

Mending Socks

An earlier version of this tutorial was previously published on Think Crafts!

Have a hole in your beautiful hand knit sock? Don’t panic, it can be fixed.

Difficulty Level
Medium

Materials
Yarn needle
Thread

Directions

You could use some of the original sock yarn to repair your hole if you saved some. I still had some leftover yarn but as you can see in the photo below my socks had really faded. I decided to go with white thread instead so the repair would be less noticeable.

The key to fixing holes is to catch them when they’re small. If a stitch breaks free it can unravel and can cause a large hole. In that case you’ll need to use a crochet hook to rework the stitch up the dropped rows. Since my hole was relatively small I could skip this step. To start, I knotted my thread on the inside of the sock.

Next I used my yarn needle to draw the thread through the stitch on the top and bottom of the hole nearest my needle.

I worked my way across the hole, weaving the needle through the disconnected stitches on the top and bottom to draw them back together with the thread.

Once all the way across I inspected the hole. It had closed up considerably but there was still a gap. I then worked the needle back across, this time from right to left. I followed the direction of the sock yarn so my thread would mimic a stitch, drawing the hole closed.

The stitches are back together! Time to knot off the thread.

Try on the sock to inspect the work.

These socks were knit with superwash yarn. However, after I repair a hole I always handwash the knitwear instead. A hole means the socks are starting to age and I want them to last as long as possible. Handwashing is much gentler than a washing machine.

One more repair pic:

Craft on!

Extracts

Back in April, the world seemed pretty scary. Not like today right? Right?!? :/ Erm…anyway. I decided to make extracts as a way to put some positivity into my future. I made vanilla extract by slicing six vanilla pods and adding them to a bottle of rum. (Some people use vodka but I think rum makes it taste better.)

I’ve made vanilla extract before but also wanted to try something new. Almond extract is a bit more work but worth the effort. I blanched a cup of almonds to make the skin slide off. After chopping them up, I added them to a bottle of grain alcohol. Then I put them in our fermentation closet, giving them a shake whenever I bottled up some kombucha.

Three months later the extracts were ready. I strained out the pods and nuts using two filters. They taste great and will be perfect for baking. Josh added some vanilla to our morning coffee and it was delicious.

Ursula is being as cute as always.